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1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding


Object of the Game

Main article: Object of the Game

The objective for both players is to score seven agenda points. The Corporation scores agenda points by advancing agendas; the Runner scores agenda points by stealing agendas from the Corporation. Agendas are cards that only appear in the Corporation's deck.

Core Rule Book|Page 3, Column 1, Paragraph 4


The Corporation also wins if the Runner is flatlined and the Runner wins if the Corporation must draw a card from his empty draw deck.

Core Rule Book|Page 3, Column 1, Paragraph 4


Setup
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Setup

To prepare a game of Android: Netrunner, carefully follow the steps below.

1. Choose Sides: The players decide who will play as the Runner and who will play as the Corporation. Then, each player places his identity card face up in his play area and takes a corresponding deck.
2. Create Token Bank: Gather the credits, advancement, brain damage, tag, bad publicity, and generic tokens into piles. Keep these piles within reach of both players.
3. Collect Starting Credits: Each player takes five credits from the bank.
4. Shuffle Decks: Each player shuffles his deck. After shuffling, each player offers his deck to his opponent for further shuffling.
5. Draw Starting Hands: Each player draws five cards from the top of his deck to form his starting hand. After drawing starting hands, the Corporation may choose to take a mulligan by shuffling his hand back into his deck and then drawing a new starting hand. After the Corporation decides whether to mulligan, the Runner decides whether to mulligan as well. If a player takes a mulligan, he must keep his second hand as his starting hand. When the players are satisfied with their starting hands, each player places his deck facedown in his play area.
Core Rule Book|Page 5, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-2 and 4-7


The Golden Rule
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: The Golden Rule

If the text of a card directly conflicts with the rules in this book, the card text takes precedence.

Core Rule Book|Page 5, Column 1, Paragraph 8


Important Vocabulary
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Players should become familiar with the following terms before reading the rest of the rules:

Active: An active card's abilities affect the game and can be triggered.

Inactive: An inactive card's abilities do not affect the game and cannot be triggered.

Install: This is the game term for playing a card onto the table.

Credit: This is the basic unit of wealth, represented by Credit.

Click: This is the basic unit of work, represented by Click.

Rez: This is the act of flipping a facedown card faceup. The Corporation installs his cards facedown and must rez them in order to use them.

Core Rule Book|Page 5, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-7


Play Areas
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Play Area

In Android: Netrunner, the play areas for the Corporation and the Runner differ significantly from one another. However, both players have a credit pool, identity card, score area, and click tracker.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Credit Pool

Each player has a credit pool where he keeps the credit tokens he has available to spend. Spent credits are returned to the token bank.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 2


Identity Card

Each player has an identity card that is placed face up in his play area. The identity card does not count toward his maximum hand or deck size, and is always active during the game.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 1


Score Area

Each player has a score area that holds his scored or stolen agendas. Agendas in a score area add their agenda points to a player's score.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 2


Click Tracker

Each player has a click tracker that he uses to track the number of clicks left that he has to spend on his turn. This is a game aid only and its use is optional.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 3

Corporation Play Area

< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

In addition to his credit pool, identity card, score area, and click tracker, the Corporation's play area includes his servers and his ice. There are two types of servers: central servers and remote servers.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 3


Central Servers

The Corporation has three central servers: Headquarters, Research and Development, and Archives. Each central server also has a root.

Headquarters (HQ)- This is the Corporation's hand of cards. Cards in HQ are inactive. The Corporation begins the game with a maximum hand size of five cards. The Corporation identity card represents HQ for the purposes of card installation.

Research and Development (R&D)- This is the Corporation's draw deck. R&D is kept facedown within reach of the Corporation. Cards in R&D are inavtive.

Archives- This is the Corporation's trash pile. Archives is kept adjacent to R&D. This is where Corporation cards are placed when they are trashed or discarded. Cards in Archives are inactive.

Some cards enter Archives faceup, and some cards enter Archives facedown. Facedown cards in Archives should be oriented horizontally so that the Runner can easily see them. Both the Corporation and Runner may look through the faceup cards stored in Archives at any time, and do not need to maintain the order of its cards while doing so. The Corporation can also look at facedown cards in Archives at any time; the Runner cannot.

Root- This is the area of a central server where upgrades for the server are installed. When an upgrade is installed in the root, it should be placed below the server. If a root has no cards installed in it, it is considered to be empty.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraphs 4-7
Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraphs 4-5


Remote Servers

The Corporation has no remote servers at the beginning of the game. The Corporation creates remote servers by installing cards. Cards in the remote servers are active if rezzed and inactive if unrezzed.

There is no limit to the number of remote servers the Corporation can have at any given time.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraphs 6-7


Ice

The Corporation installs ice to protect his servers. Installed ice is always dedicated to a particular server and placed in front of that server. Ice can protect an empty server. Ice is active if rezzed and inactive if unrezzed.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 8

Runner Play Area

< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

In addition to his credit pool, identity card, and click tracker, the Runner's play area includes his grip, his stack, his heap, and his rig.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 8


Grip

This is the Runner's hand of cards. The Runner begins the game with a maximum hand size of five cards. Cards in the grip are inactive.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 9


Stack

This is the Runner's draw deck. The stack is kept facedown within reach of the Runner. Cards in the stack are inactive.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 1, Paragraph 10


Heap

This is the Runner's trash pile. The heap is kept adjacent to the Runner's identity card. This is where Runner cards are placed when they are trashed or discarded. Cards in the heap are faceup and inactive. Both the Runner and Corporation may look through the heap at any time, but must maintain the order of its cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 9


Rig

This is where the Runner installs his cards. The rig is separated into three rows: one for programs, one for hardware, and one for resources. Cards in the rig are active.

Core Rule Book|Page 6, Column 2, Paragraph 10


Corporation Cards
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

There are six types of Corporation cards: identities, operations, agendas, ice, upgrades, and assets. All cards except the identity card are shuffled into the Corporation's deck at the beginning of the game. Corporation cards are installed facedown, and are inactive unless rezzed.

Core Rule Book|Page 8, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Corporation Identity Card

Identity cards indicate which identity the Corporation has assumed.

The Corporation identity card defines the Corporation's faction and describes the identity's special ability. It also provides a minimum deck size that must be observed when deckbuilding and the amount of influence available for spending on out-of-faction cards.

Note: The Corporation's identity card also represents his HQ for the purposes of card installation: ice protecting HQ is installed in front of the Corporation's identity card, and upgrades installed in the root of HQ are installed behind the Corporation's identity card.

Core Rule Book|Page 8, Column 1, Paragraphs 2-4


Operations

Operations represent singular occurrences and are always trashed after being played.

The Corporation pays credits equal to the play cost of an operation to play it. When played, an operation's abilities as listed in its text box are resolved. Then, the operation is immediately trashed. Operations are never installed.

Core Rule Book|Page 8, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-2


Agendas

Agendas are valuable pieces of the Corporation's data, and are the only cards in Android: Netrunner that are worth agenda points.

The Corporation installs agendas in remote servers. Agendas are the only cards in the game worth agenda points. Agendas have an advancement requirement that must be met before the Corporation can score them.

Agendas cannot be rezzed and are only active while in a score area. There can be only one agenda or one asset installed in a remote server at a time.

Core Rule Book|Page 8, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-5


Ice

Ice defends the Corporation's servers against intrusions by the Runner.

The Corporation installs ice in front of any server. Ice is not active until it is rezzed by paying credits equal to its rez cost.

A piece of ice has one or more subroutines (Subroutine) in its text box that the Runner must break during a run or suffer their effects if the ice is rezzed.

Core Rule Book|Page 9, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-3


Upgrades

Upgrades are improvements to a server that provide the Corporation with a wide variety of benefits and bonuses.

The Corporation installs upgrades in remote servers or the roots of central servers. Upgrades are the only card type that can be installed in the root of a central server. An upgrade is not active until it is rezzed by paying credits equal to its rez cost.

There is no limit to the number of upgrades that can be installed in a server. When the Runner accesses an upgrade, he can trash it by paying credits equal to its trash cost.

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Assets

Assets provide the Corporation with resources and connections that help him advance and score his agendas.

The Corporation installs assets in remote servers. An asset is not active until it is rezzed by paying credits equal to its rez cost.

Some assets can also be advanced, giving them the appearance of agendas and potentially misleading the Runner. When the Runner accesses an asset, he can trash it by paying credits equal to its trash cost.

There can be only one agenda or one asset installed in a remote server at a time.

Core Rule Book|Page 9, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-4


Runner Cards
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

There are five types of Runner cards: identities, hardware, resources, programs, and events. All cards except the identity card are shuffled into the Runner's deck at the beginning of the game. Runner cards are always active while installed.

Core Rule Book|Page 10, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Runner Identity Card

Identity cards indicate which identity the Runner has assumed.

The Runner identity card defines the Runner's faction and describes the identity's special ability. It also provides a minimum deck size that must be observed when constructing a deck, and the amount of influence available for spending on out-of-faction cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 10, Column 1, Paragraphs 2-3


Hardware

Hardware is the array of physical tools at the Runner's disposal.

The Runner installs hardware in his rig by paying an install cost.

There is no limit to the amount of hardware the Runner can install in his rig.

Core Rule Book|Page 10, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-3


Resources

Resources are a wide variety of connections, assets, and skills that aid the Runner.

The Runner installs resources in his rig by paying an install cost.

There is no limit to the number of resources the Runner can install in his rig.

When the Runner is tagged, resources may be trashed by the Corporation.

Core Rule Book|Page 10, Column 2, Paragraphs 4-7


Programs

Programs are the digital tools at the Runner's disposal, primarily as a means of intrusion.

The Runner installs programs in his rig by paying an install cost.

Programs are the only card type that have a memory cost. The memory cost of his installed programs can never exceed his current memory limit.

The Runner uses a program subtype called an icebreaker to break ice subroutines during runs. An icebreaker's strength must be equal to or greater than the ice it is interacting with.

Core Rule Book|Page 11, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-4


Events

Events represent singular occurrences and are always trashed after being played.

The Runner pays credits equal to the play cost of an event to play it. When played, an event's abilities as listed in its text box are resolved. Then, the event is immediately trashed. Events are never installed.

Core Rule Book|Page 11, Column 1, Paragraphs 5-6


< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Paid Ability

Some card abilities have trigger costs that a player must pay before the effect of the ability can be resolved. These abilities are called paid abilities. A card's trigger cost is always listed in its text box before the effect, following the format "cost: effect."

The most common costs are spending clicks (Click), spending credits (Credit), trashing the card (Trash), and spending hosted counters. Some effects feature a combination of costs.

If the player cannot pay the full cost of an ability, he cannot trigger it.

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Unique Cards
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Unique

Some cards have a unique symbol (◆) in front of their title. There can be only one unique card of the same title active at a time. If a card with a unique title becomes active, any other card that shares its title is immediately trashed. This trashing cannot be prevented.

Core Rule Book|Page 11, Column 2, Paragraph 5


Playing the Game
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

In Android: Netrunner, the Corporation and the Runner alternate taking turns. Android: Netrunner is unusual in that the Runner and the Corporation are governed by different rules. Players should familiarize themselves with the rules for both sides.

The Corporation always takes the first turn of the game.

Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-2

Turn Overview

Each player, during his turn, takes actions by spending clicks. A player can only spend his clicks during his own Action phase, and he must spend all of his clicks in each Action phase. The Corporation begins his turn with three clicks (Click Click Click) and the Runner begins his turn with four clicks (Click Click Click Click).

Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 1, Paragraph 3


Corporation's Turn
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Turn - Corporation's Turn

The Corporation's turn consists of three phases, which he performs in the following order:

1. Draw Phase: The Corporation draws one card from R&D.
2. Action Phase: The Corporation has Click Click Click with which to perform actions.
3. Discard Phase: The Corporation discards down to his maximum hand size, if necessary.
Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 1, Paragraphs 4-7

Rezzed and Unrezzed Cards

The Corporation's installed cards have two play states: rezzed, which means that the card is faceup and active, and unrezzed, which means that the card is facedown and inactive. The Corporation can look at his unrezzed cards at any time. To rez an installed card, the Corporation pays its rez cost and turns the card faceup.

Note: Rezzing a card does not cost the Corporation a click.

To organize this hidden information for both players, it is important that the Corporation observes the following rules for card orientation:

  • Agendas, assets, and upgrades are always installed in a vertical orientation.
  • Ice is always installed in a horizontal orientation.
Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 1, Paragraphs 8-10

1. Draw Phase

The Corporation draws the top card of R&D. This does not cost the Corporation any clicks.

Note: If the Corporation's R&D is empty when he attempts to draw a card, the Runner immediately wins the game.

Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-2

2. Action Phase

In his Action phase, the Corporation takes actions by spending Click Click Click. He can only take actions during his Action phase, and he must spend all three of his clicks during his Action phase.

The Corporation can perform any of the following actions as many times as he likes, and in any combination, provided he can pay for them. These are listed in the format of "cost: effect."

  • Click: Draw one card from R&D.
  • Click: Gain 1Credit (one credit).
  • Click: Install an agenda, asset, upgrade, or piece of ice.
  • Click: Play an operation.
  • Click, 1Credit: Advance a card.
  • Click, 2Credit: Trash a resource in the Runner's rig if the Runner is tagged.
  • Click Click Click: Purge virus counters
  • Trigger a Click ability on an active card (cost varies).

Whenever the Corporation spends clicks on one of these actions, he is considered to be taking an action and cannot take another action until the current action fully resolves.

When the Corporation has spent all of his clicks, his Action phase ends and his Discard phase begins.

Core Rule Book|Page 12, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-6


Drawing One Card

For Click, the Corporation draws the top card of R&D and adds it to HQ.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Gaining One Credit

For Click, the Corporation takes 1Credit from the bank and adds it to his credit pool.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 1, Paragraph 2


Installing Cards

For Click, the Corporation installs a single agenda, asset, upgrade, or piece of ice from HQ, placing it facedown on the table.

Note: When an asset or upgrade is installed, the Corporation can pay its rez cost to rez it at almost any time. Ice can only be rezzed when the Runner approaches it during a run.

When installing a card in a server, the Corporation can first trash any cards already installed in that server. Trashed cards go to Archives faceup if they are rezzed, and facedown if they are unrezzed.

If the Corporation choose to create a remote server when installing a card, he installs the card by placing it facedown in a discrete location in his play area. Agendas, assets, upgrades, and ice can all be used to create a new remote server. If the Corporation creates a remote server by installing ice, the server exists, but is considered to be empty. An empty server can still be run against by the Runner.

Note: Installed cards cannot be rearranged or mixed-up by either player except through card effects.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 1, Paragraphs 3-7


Agendas- An agenda can only be installed in a remote server. After an agenda is installed, the Corporation can advance and ultimately score it.

Note: A remote server can have only one agenda or asset installed in it at a time.

If the Corporation wants to install an agenda in a remote server that has an asset or an agenda already installed in it, he can install the card but must trash the existing card first as part of the install action. The Corporation does not have to trash upgrades in order to install an agenda or an asset.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 1, Paragraphs 10-11


Assets- An asset can only be installed in a remote server.

If the Corporation wants to install an agenda in a remote server that has an asset or agenda already installed in it, he can install the card but must trash the existing card first as part of the install action.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 1, Paragraph 13


Upgrades- An upgrade can be installed in any server. When an upgrade is installed in a central server, it is installed in the central server's root.

Unlike an agenda or asset, there is no limit to the number of upgrades the Corporation can install in any server, central or remote.

Note: The Corporation can only have one upgrade with the region subtype installed per server or server root, as listed in the text box of these cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 2, Paragraphs 2-3


Ice- Ice can be installed in front of any server in order to protect that server. After a piece of ice is installed in front of a server, it is dedicated to that server and cannot be moved or rearranged.

When the Corporation installs a piece of ice, he must install it in the outermost position of the server and pay an install cost equal to the number of pieces of ice already protecting that server. The outermost position is the position farthest from the server, in front of any other pieces of ice that are protecting the server.

When installing ice, the Corporation can first trash any ice protecting that server in order to reduce the install cost. Then, he installs the new piece of ice in the outermost position in front of the server.

Core Rule Book|Page 13, Column 2, Paragraphs 5-6


Playing Operations

For Click, the Corporation plays an operation from his hand by paying its play cost. He then places it faceup in his play area, immediately resolves the effects of the operation, and trashes it.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Advancing a Card

For Click and 1Credit, the Corporation adds one advancement token to an installed card. Agendas can always be advanced while installed. Cards other than agendas can only be advanced if their text box allows it. There is no limit to the number of times a card can be advanced.

Note: If a card's text box says that the card can be advanced, the card can be advanced even when the card is unrezzed.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraphs 2-3


Scoring Agendas- When the number of advancement tokens on an agenda is equal to or higher than its advancement requirement, the agenda is fully advanced and the Corporation can score it. The only times the Corporation can score an agenda is right before his turn begins, or after he completes an action.

To score an agenda, the Corporation turns it faceup and places it in his score area, resolving any conditional abilities on the agenda that use the language "When you score." The Corporation cannot score an agenda until it is fully advanced. Scoring an agenda does not cost a click and it not an action.

While an agenda is in the Corporation's score area, it is active and adds its agenda points to his score.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraphs 5-6


Advancing Assets

Some assets can be advanced. Advancing assets gives them the appearance of being agendas. This can be useful in bluffing the Runner into making runs which are not beneficial to him.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraph 7


Delayed Scoring- An agenda sometimes has an ability that rewards advancement beyond the agenda's advancement requirement, or an ability that encourages the Corporation to delay scoring the agenda. The Corporation is not required to score an agenda immediately upon satisfying its advancement requirement. He may instead advance it more, or wait for a more opportune time to score it.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraph 8


Trashing a Runner's Resource

If the Runner is tagged, the Corporation can spend Click and 2Credit to choose one of the Runner's resources and trash it.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraph 9


Purging Virus Counters

For Click Click Click, the Corporation removes all virus counters hosted on cards, returning them to the token bank.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 1, Paragraph 10


Triggering Click Abilities

Some cards have abilities with trigger costs that require the Corporation to spend one or more clicks. These abilities list the Click icon in their trigger cost, and the Corporation can trigger these abilities only during his Action Phase.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 2, Paragraph 1

3. Discard Phase

The Corporation begins the game with a maximum hand size of five cards, but card effects can increase or decrease this limit. If the cards in HQ exceed the Corporation's current maximum hand size at the beginning of the Discard phase, he must discard down to his maximum hand size.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 2, Paragraph 2


Trashing and Discarding

A discarded card is not considered to have been trashed, and vice versa. Cards that prevent a card from being trashed cannot prevent a card from being discarded.

If the Corporation must discard more than one card from HQ, he chooses and discards cards from HQ one at a time until he is no longer above his current maximum hand size.

Cards discarded from HQ are always sent to Archives facedown, regardless of whether they have been previously accessed by the Runner.

After the Corporation completes his Discard phase, the Runner begins his turn.

Core Rule Book|Page 14, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-6


Runner's Turn
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Runner's Turn

The Runner's turn is divided into two phases, which he performs in the following order:

1. Action Phase: The Runner has Click Click Click Click with which to perform actions.
2. Discard Phase: The Runner discards down to his maximum hand size, if necessary.
Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-3

1. Action Phase

In his Action phase, the Runner takes actions by spending Click Click Click Click. He can only take actions during his Action phase, and he must spend all four of his clicks during his Action phase.

The Runner can perform any of the following actions as many times as he likes, and in any combination, provided he can pay for them. These are listed in the format of "cost: effect."

  • Click: Draw one card from the Stack.
  • Click: Gain 1Credit.
  • Click: Install a program, resource, or piece of hardware.
  • Click: Play an event.
  • Click, 2Credit: Remove one tag.
  • Click: Make a run.
  • Trigger a Click ability on an active card (cost varies).

Whenever the Runner spends clicks on one of these actions, he is considered to be taking an action and cannot take another action until the current action fully resolves.

When the Runner has spent all of his clicks, his Action phase ends and his Discard phase begins.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraphs 4-7


Drawing One Card

For Click, the Runner draws the top card from his stack and adds it to his grip.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraph 8


Gaining One Credit

For Click, the Runner takes 1Credit from the bank and adds it to his credit pool.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraph 9


Installing Cards

For Click, the Runner installs a single program, resource, or piece of hardware faceup in his rig. An installed Runner card is active and does not have to be rezzed like a Corporation card.

Note: The Runner's cards are always installed faceup and in a vertical orientation.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraphs 10-11


Programs- To install a program, the Runner pays the program's install cost and places it in his program row. Each program also has a memory cost. The Runner cannot have programs installed that have a combined memory cost greater than his available memory units (MU). The Runner begins the game with four MU, though certain card effects can increase or decrease this value.

If the MU cost of the Runner's installed programs ever exceed his available MU, he must trash his installed programs until he is no longer exceeding his available MU.

The Runner can choose to trash any number of his installed programs at the beginning of an install program action.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 1, Paragraph 12
Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-2


Resources- To install a resource, the Runner pays the resource's install cost and places it in his resource row.

There is no limit to the number of resources a Runner can have installed.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-4


Hardware- To install a piece of hardware, the Runner pays the hardware's install cost and places it in his hardware row.

There is no limit to the amount of hardware a Runner can have installed.

Note: The Runner can only have one piece of hardware with the console subtype installed at a time, as listed in the text box of these cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraphs 6-7


Playing Events

For Click, the Runner plays an event from his hand by paying its play cost. He then places it faceup in his play area, immediately resolves the effects of the event, and trashes it.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraph 8


Removing Tags

For Click and 2Credit, the Runner removes one of his tags.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraph 9


Making a Run

For Click, the Runner initiates a run against the Corporation in order to steal the Corporation's agendas and trash his cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraph 10


Triggering Click Abilities

Some cards have abilities with trigger costs that require the Runner to spend one or more clicks. These abilities list the Click icon in their trigger cost, and the Runner can trigger these abilities only during his Action phase.

2. Discard Phase

The Runner begins the game with a maximum hand size of five cards, but card effects can increase or decrease this limit. If the cards in the Runner's grip exceed his current maximum hand size at the beginning of the Discard phase, he must discard down to his maximum hand size.

If the Runner must discard more than one card from his grip, he chooses and discards cards from his grip one at a time until he is no longer above his current maximum hand size.

After the Runner completes his Discard phase, the Corporation begins his turn.

Core Rule Book|Page 15, Column 2, Paragraphs 12-14


Runs
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Run

Runs are the heart of Android: Netrunner, and provide opportunities for the Runner to steal the Corporation's agendas and trash his cards. In a run, the Runner attacks one of the Corporation's servers in an attempt to access cards, using installed programs to help him pass the Corporation's ice.

Because most runs pit the Runner's installed icebreaker programs against the Corporation's installed ice, it is vital that both players understand the functions and subtypes of the Corporation's ice and the Runner's icebreakers.

Core Rule Book|Page 16, Column 1, Paragraphs 1-2

Ice

Ice is defensive software the Corporation installs in front of his servers to protect his valuable data. There are four main subtypes that can appear on a piece of ice: sentry, barrier, code gate, and trap. Ice also has separate abilities called subroutines.

Core Rule Book|Page 16, Column 1, Paragraph 3


Subroutines

Subroutines are abilities of a piece of ice marked by the Subroutine symbol. If the Runner encounters a piece of rezzed ice and does not or cannot break its subroutines, the unbroken subroutines trigger and resolve one by one.

In addition to preventing the Runner's access to the Corporation's servers by ending his run, subroutines can pose other hazards if allowed to trigger, such as damaging the Runner or initiating trace attempts.

Core Rule Book|Page 16, Column 1, Paragraphs 4-5

Icebreakers

Icebreakers are programs with the icebreaker subtype that the Runner can use to overcome ice encountered during a run. Each icebreaker has a strength, an install cost, and one or more subtypes that reflect which kind of ice subroutine it is designed to break.

The Runner uses icebreakers to interact with and break subroutines on ice. An icebreaker can only interact with ice that has equal or lower strength than the icebreaker.

In addition to this strength requirement, many icebreaker abilities can only be used to break subroutines on particular subtypes of ice. It does not matter if the ice has additional subtypes, provided it has any subtypes referred to by the icebreaker's ability. If an ability does not restrict itself to a subtype, it can be used against any piece of ice.

Core Rule Book|Page 16, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-3

Increasing an Icebreaker's Strength

Subroutines are abilities of a piece of ice marked by the Subroutine symbol. If the Runner encounters a piece of rezzed ice and does not or cannot break its subroutines, the unbroken subroutines trigger and resolve one by one.

Core Rule Book|Page 16, Column 1, Paragraph 4

Phases of a Run

Runs typically transpire in three phases. Not every run will include all of these phases.

  1. Initiation Phase
  2. Confrontation Phase
  3. Access Phase
Core Rule Book|Page 17, Column 1, Paragraph 1

Bad Publicity

Some cards and events in Android: Netrunner give the Corporation bad publicity. For each point of bad publicity the Corporation has, the Runner gains 1Credit at the beginning of each run. The Runner may spend these credits during his run as if they were in his credit pool, but any unspent bad publicity credits return to the bank at the end of the run. Bad publicity always generates revenue for the Runner at the beginning of a run, even when the Runner makes multiple runs in a single turn.

Core Rule Book|Page 17, Column 1, Paragraph 2

1. Initiation Phase

To initiate a run, the Runner declares the server that he is attacking. The Runner can only initiate a run against a single server per run action.

After the Runner declares the server he is attacking, he gains 1Credit to spend during the run for each point of bad publicity the Corporation has. Then, both players check to see if there is ice protecting the attacked server.

If there is ice protecting the server, the run proceeds to the Confrontation phase.

If there is no ice protecting the server, the run proceeds to the Access phase.

Core Rule Book|Page 17, Column 1, Paragraphs 3-6

2. Confrontation Phase

The Confrontation phase consists of approaching a piece of ice and then potentially encountering that ice. A Runner approaches each piece of ice protecting the server one at a time, starting with the outermost piece. The Runner must pass each piece of ice in order to approach the next piece of ice protecting the server, continuing until all pieces of ice have been passed or until the run ends. If the Runner passes all pieces of ice protecting the attacked server, the run proceeds to the Access Phase.

Core Rule Book|Page 17, Column 1, Paragraph 7


Approaching Ice

When the Runner approaches a piece of ice, he must first decide whether he wishes to continue the run or jack out. If he decides to jack out, he ends his run and the run is considered unsuccessful. The Runner cannot jack out while approaching the first piece of ice during a run.

If the Runner decides to continue instead of jacking out, the Corporation has the opportunity to rez the approached piece of ice and any other non-ice cards.

Note: The Corporation can only rez ice when it is approached.

If the approached piece of ice is rezzed after the Corporation has the opportunity to rez cards, then the Runner encounters it.

If after rezzing cards the approached piece of ice is not rezzed, then the Runner passes it. He then continues the run by either approaching the next piece of ice protecting the server or proceeding to the Access phase if there is no more ice to approach.

Core Rule Book|Page 17, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-5


Encountering Ice

When the Runner encounters a piece of ice, he has the opportunity to break any subroutines on that piece of ice. After the Runner finishes breaking any subroutines that he wishes to break, each unbroken subroutine on that ice triggers in the order listed on the card. If a subroutine ends the run, then the run ends immediately and no further subroutines on that piece of ice trigger.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Breaking Subroutines- To break a subroutine, the Runner uses abilities on his installed icebreakers. The Runner can break the subroutines on the encountered ice in any order he chooses. There is no limit to the number of installed cards a Runner can use to interact with the encountered ice, but he generally only needs one icebreaker. Remember that before an icebreaker can interact with a piece of ice, the icebreaker's strength must be equal to or higher than the encountered ice's strength.

Note: Breaking all subroutines on a piece of ice does not mean the ice is trashed. A passed ice remains installed and is approached during every subsequent run against the server it protects.

After the Runner breaks all of the ice's subroutines and/or any effects from unbroken subroutines resolve without ending the run, he has passed that piece of ice. He then continues the run by either approaching the next piece of ice protecting the server or proceeding to the Access phase if there is no more ice to approach.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 1, Paragraphs 3-4

3. Access Phase

After the Runner has passed all of the ice protecting the attacked server, he has one final opportunity to jack out.If he chooses to continue, the Corporation has one final opportunity to rez cards. After rezzing cards, the run is considered to be successful and the Runner accesses the Corporation's cards by looking at them. The type of server attacked determines the degree and method of access, and the Runner must access cards according to the following rules:

  • R&D: The Runner accesses the top card of R&D, and any upgrades in its root. Unless the Runner steals, trashes, or is forced by a card's text to reveal the card, he does not show cards accessed from R&D to the Corporation.
  • HQ: The Runner accesses one random card from HQ and any upgrades in its root. Any cards the Runner does not steal or trash return to HQ.
  • Archives: The Runner accesses all cards in Archives and any upgrades in its root. The Runner turns all cards faceup before accessing them, and does not need to keep them in order. The Runner steals all agendas in Archives and cannot trash cards that are already in Archives. After accessing Archives, all cards in Archives return to Archives faceup.
  • Remote Server: The Runner accesses all cards in the server.

Note: Installed ice is not in a server and is never accessed.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 1, Paragraphs 5-10


Stealing Agendas

If the Runner accesses an agenda, he steals it and places it faceup in his score area, resolving any conditional abilities on the agenda that use the language "when you steal." While an agenda is in the Runner's score area, it adds its agenda points to his score. The Runner cannot decline to steal agendas he accesses.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 2, Paragraph 1


Trashing Cards

If the Runner accesses a card with a trash cost, he may pay credits equal to its trash cost in order to trash it to Archives faceup.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 2, Paragraph 2


Accessing Multiple Cards

When accessing multiple cards, the Runner accesses them one at a time in any order he likes. For example, the Runner may access a card from HQ, then an upgrade installed in the root of HQ, and then another card from HQ, if he has the ability to do so.

When accessing multiple cards from R&D, the Runner must draw them in order from the top of the deck, and must return any cards not scored or trashed in reverse order, so as to preserve their positions in R&D.

The Runner must fully resolve his access to a card (steal it, pay to trash it, et.c) before accessing the next card. If the Runner scores an agenda that gives him severn or more points, he immediately wins the game, even if he would otherwise access more cards.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-5


Concluding the Run

After the Runner has accessed all required cards, he returns any cards not stolen or trashed to their original play states. For example, an unrezzed card in a remote server returns facedown to that server, and a card accessed from HQ returns to HQ.

After a Runner finishes accessing cards, the run ends. The Runner returns any unspent bad publicity credits to the token bank, and the Runner resumes his Action phase.

Core Rule Book|Page 18, Column 2, Paragraphs 6-7


Traces and Tags
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Though the Corporation spends much of the game repelling the Runner's intrusions, traces and tags give the Corporation opportunities to attack the Runner.

Core Rule Book|Page 20, Column 1, Paragraph 1

Traces

Some card abilities initiate a trace on the Runner. Traces are marked by the language "TraceX" on a card, with X equaling the base trace strength of the trace. Traces pit the Corporation's trace strength against the Runner's link strength, both of which are increased by spending credits.

The Corporation acts first during a trace, openly spending any number of credits to increase his trace strength by one point for each credit he spends. There is no limit to the number of credits the Corporation can spend on the trace.

After the Corporation spends his credits, the Runner has the opportunity to openly spend credits to increase his link strength. The Runner's base link strength is equal to the number of links (Link) he has in play. The Runner increases his link strength by one point for each credit he spends. There is no limit to the number of credits the Runner can spend on the trace.

After the Runner finishes increasing his link strength, it is compared to the Corporation's trace strength. If the trace strength exceeds the link strength, the trace is successful and any "If successful" effects associated with the trace are resolved. If the link strength is equal to or greater than the trace strength, then the trace is unsuccessful, and any "If unsuccessful" effects associated with the trace are resolved.

Core Rule Book|Page 20, Column 1, Paragraphs 2-5

Tags

Certain card effects result in a tag being placed on the Runner. As long as the Runner has at least one tag, he is considered to be tagged. While the Runner is tagged, the Corporation may, as an action, spend Click and 2Credit to trash one of the Runner's resources. Certain card effects can also trigger off of the Runner being tagged, and it is usually dangerous for the Runner to remain tagged for very long.

While tagged, the Runner may, as an action, spend Click and 2Credit to remove the tag, returning it to the token bank. The Runner can repeat this action as many times he likes, provided he has the clicks and credits to pay its cost, and as long as he has a tag to remove.

Core Rule Book|Page 20, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-2


Damage
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Damage

Many cards and ice subroutines inflict damage on the Runner. The Runner can receive the following three types of damage:

  • Meat Damage: The Runner randomly trashes one card from his grip for each point of meat damage done to him.
  • Net Damage: The Runner randomly trashes one card from his grip for each point of net damage done to him.
  • Brain Damage: The Runner randomly trashes one card from his grip for each point of brain damage done to him, and his maximum hand size is permanently reduced by one card. The Runner takes a brain damage token to track this.

Note: The only differences between net and meat damage are the cards that inflict and prevent them.

When the Runner trashes multiple cards for damage, the cards are placed in his heap in the order they were randomly trashed.

If the Runner takes more damage than the number of cards in his grip, or if he has a maximum hand size of less than zero at the end of his turn, then he is flatlined and the Corporation wins the game.

Core Rule Book|Page 20, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-9


Winning the Game
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Object of the Game

If at any time a player has seven agenda points in his score area, he immediately wins the game.

If R&D contains no cards and the Corporation attempts to draw a card, the Runner immediately wins the game.

If the Runner is flatlined, the Corporation wins the game.

Core Rule Book|Page 20, Column 2, Paragraphs 10-12


Additional Rules
< Previous - Top - Next >
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

The following sections describe additional important rules and information not addressed in the previous sections.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 1, Paragraph 1

Card Abilities

There are two different types of card abilities in Android: Netrunner: constant abilities and triggered abilities.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 1, Paragraph 2


Constant Abilities

Constant abilities continually affect the game as long as the card they appear on is active and any other specified conditions are met. They are not triggered and do not have costs associated with them An example of a constant ability is the card Experiential Data, which reads, "All ice protecting this server has +1 strength."

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 1, Paragraph 3


Triggered Abilities

In order to use a triggered ability a prerequisite must be met. This prerequisite is either a trigger cost that must be paid (paid ability) or a trigger condition that must be met (conditional ability). Once an ability is triggered, its effect is resolved immediately and can only be stopped by prevent or avoid effects. Players must follow all restrictions on the cards when triggering abilities.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 1, Paragraph 4


In order to trigger a paid ability, a trigger cost must be met. The most common trigger costs are spending clicks, credits, or hosted counters, and trashing cards. A card's trigger cost is always listed in its text box before the effect, following the format "cost: effect." A paid ability can be triggered an unlimited number of times as long as the cost is paid and any restrictions specified by the effect are observed. Paid abilities can be triggered at the beginning of each turn, before and after each player action, and at certain points during a run, unless the ability requires a click, in which case it must be triggered as an action. An example of a paid ability is the card Magnum Opus, which reads, "Click: Gain 2Credit."

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 1, Paragraph 5


Conditional abilities

In order for a conditional ability to trigger, a trigger condition must be met. A conditional ability can only be resolved once per trigger condition. Trigger conditions commonly use the terms "When" or "Whenever" in their card text. An example of a conditional ability is the card PAD Campaign, which reads, "Gain 1Credit when your turn begins."

If a conditional ability uses the word "may" in its description, it is an optional conditional ability. The decision to trigger the ability belongs to the player who controls the card, provided the ability's trigger condition is met. If a conditional ability does not use the word "may" in its description, it is a required conditional ability. It must be triggered when its trigger condition is met, although the exact time of resolution may vary.

Note: Ice subroutines are required conditional abilities that can be broken, in which case they do not resolve.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-3

Other Terms and Concepts

There are several other terms and concepts that players should know when resolving abilities.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraph 4


Timing Priority

Whenever there is an opportunity to trigger paid abilities, rez cards and/or score agendas (usually at the beginning of a turn and after each action), the player who is currently tracking his turn gets the first opportunity to act. He can trigger as many paid abilities, rez as many cards, and/or score as many agendas as he wishes in the order of his choosing. When he is finished, the other player gets the opportunity to act. When that player is finished, the first player gets the opportunity to act once again.

After both players have had at least one opportunity to act and a player declines to act, then the players cannot trigger more paid abilities, rez more cards, or score more agendas until the next opportunity to do so.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraphs 5-6


Prevent or Avoid

Some card abilities use the words "prevent" or "avoid." Prevent or avoid effects are the only effects which can disrupt another effect. A prevent or avoid effect states what it is preventing or avoiding, and an effect that is prevented or avoided is not resolved. Prevent or avoid effects can be triggered whenever the effect they are preventing or avoiding is resolving.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraph 8


Self-referential Language

Unless otherwise noted, a card with text that refers to its own card title only refers to itself and does not refer to other copies of cards with that title.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraph 9


Negative Effects

If an effect prohibits a player from doing something, usually by using the word "cannot," it always takes precedence over other effects unless another effect explicitly overrides it.

Core Rule Book|Page 21, Column 2, Paragraph 10


Trashing

When trashing a card as part of a trigger cost for its own paid ability (Trash), the effect on that card will resolve even though the card is no longer active.

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 1, Paragraph 1


Expose

Some effects expose one or more cards. Generally, only unrezzed installed cards can be exposed, unless an ability specifies otherwise. An exposed card is revealed to all players, and then returned to its previous state. If multiple cards are exposed by one effect, they are considered to be exposed simultaneously.

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 1, Paragraph 2


Simultaneous Effects

When one or more abilities have the same timing trigger or can be triggered at the same time, each player chooses the order his own abilities trigger. A player can trigger an optional conditional ability before a required conditional ability if they both have the same trigger condition.

If players ever want to perform simultaneous effects at the same time, the player whose turn it is resolves all of his effects first.

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 1, Paragraphs 3-4


Hosting

"Hosting" is the result of placing a card, counter, or token on top of a card, creating a relationship between the host card and what is hosted. If a card allows other cards to be hosted on it, those cards must be hosted on the card when they are installed, unless a card says otherwise.

Hosted counters or tokens can be spent without affecting their host. If a trigger cost requires one or more hosted counters or tokens, those counters or tokens are "spent" by being returned to the token bank from the card the ability appears on.

If a host is trashed or uninstalled, all cards, counters, and tokens hosted on it are also trashed. This cannot be prevented. If a host Corp card is derezzed, all cards, counters, and tokens hosted no it remain hosted.

The state of hosting is distinct (but not exclusive from) the state of installing. Most cards are hosted on another card when they are installed. If a card is hosted but not installed, the card is inactive.

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 1, Paragraphs 5-7


Forfeiting Agendas

Some card abilities require the Corporation or Runner to forfeit an agenda. When a player forgets an agenda, he selects any agenda in his score area and permanently removes it from the game (it does not go to Archives or the heap). He no longer scores points for the forfeited agenda.

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 2, Paragraph 1

Symbols

Credit: This symbol stands for credit. It always appears with a number, such as 1Credit, which means "one credit," or 3Credit, which means "three credits."

Click: This symbol stands for a single click. Multiple clicks are represented by multiple symbols, such as Click Click, which means "two clicks."

RecurringCredit: This symbol stands for recurring credit. It always appears with a numeral, such as 1RecurringCredit, which means "one recurring credit," or 3RecurringCredit, which means "three recurring credits." Recurring credits are placed on a card when the card becomes active, and can be used immediately. Any recurring credits a player spends are replaced on their host card at the beginning of that player's turn. A player can only spend these credits as instructed by their host card.

Link: This symbol stands for link. It is always used with a quantity, such as +1Link, which means "plus 1 link."

MemoryUnit-1: This symbol stands for memory unit. It always appears with a quantity, such as +MemoryUnit-2, which means "plus 2 memory units."

Subroutine: This symbol stands for subroutine and only appears on ice. Each symbol marks a single subroutine on a piece of ice.

Trash: This symbol stands for trash. It is used as a self-referential trigger cost in a card text, such as "Trash: Draw 2 cards," which means "trash this card to draw 2 cards."

Core Rule Book|Page 22, Column 2, Paragraphs 3-9


Deckbuilding
< Previous - Top
1 Object of the Game 6 Corporation Play Area 11 Unique Cards 16 Traces and Tags
2 Setup 7 Runner Play Area 12 Playing the Game 17 Damage
3 The Golden Rule 8 Corporation Cards 13 Corporation's Turn 18 Winning the Game
4 Important Vocabulary 9 Runner Cards 14 Runner's Turn 19 Additional Rules
5 Play Areas 10 Paid Abilities 15 Runs 20 Deckbuilding

Main article: Deckbuilding

When building a deck for organized play, players must observe the following restrictions:

A deck must be associated with a single identity card, and cannot contain fewer cards than the minimum deck size value listed on the chosen identity card. There is no maximum deck size, but the deck must be able to be sufficiently randomized in a short period of time. Identity cards, reference cards, and click tracker cards are never counted as part of a deck and do not count against the minimum deck size.

A deck cannot have more than three copies of of a single card (by title) in it.

A deck associated with a Runner identity can never contain Corporation cards and vice versa.

A deck cannot contain out-of-faction cards with a total influence value that exceeds the influence limit listed on the chosen identity card. Cards that match the faction of the identity card do not count against this limit.

A corporation deck must have a specific number of agenda points in it base on the size of the deck, as follows:

  • 40 to 44 cards requires 18 or 19 agenda points.
  • 45 to 49 cards requires 20 or 21 agenda points.
  • 50 to 54 cards requires 22 or 23 agenda points.

For decks larger than this, add 2 additional agenda points to the 54 card deck requirement each time the number of cards in the deck reaches a multiple of 5.

Core Rule Book|Page 24, Column 2, Paragraphs 1-7

Influence

A player may wish to include cards in his deck that do not match the faction of his identity card. He is restricted, however, by the influence limit on his identity card. The combined influence value of out-of-faction cards in his deck cannot exceed this limit. Each card's influence value is represented by small blue orbs near the bottom of the card.

Neutral cards are not part of any faction, can be used in any deck of the side they are affiliated with, and generally have an influence value of zero.

Note: Some cards do not have any influence value (this is different than a card that has an influence value of zero). These cards are identified by their lack of an influence box. A card without an influence value cannot be used with an identity card that has a different faction affiliation.

Core Rule Book|Page 24, Column 2, Paragraphs 9-11

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